Smithsonian Center for Lation Initiatives
The Interpretation and Representation of Latino Cultures: Research and Museums Conference Documentation
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Nunn, Tey Marianna

Challenging Traditional Curatorial Practices

Historicizing Narratives

Borders and Diasporas

Aesthetics Beauty

The Body: The Real and the Symbolic

All Abstracts

Discussions

Bibliography

The Cyber Arte Exhibition: A Curator's Journey Through Community and Controversy

When the exhibition CyberArte: Tradition meets Technology opened at the Museum of International Folk Art in Sajita Fe on February 25th' 2001, a tremendous amount of press had already been written in such publications as American Art, Art and Antiques, Hispanic Magazine, and the Santa Fe New Mexican. The reviews, prior to opening day, praised this small exhibition of less then 600 square feet for the cutting edge show that it was meant to be-- and that it was. Few of them mentioned the now famous digital collage by Alma Lopez titled Our Lady.

This paper will address many issues of institutional representation multiple communities, and identity politics with specific examples from the "Our Lady Controversy" as well as discuss what worked in the complex situation and what didn't.

Taxpayer funded institutions, church versus state, first amendment rights, censorship and self-censorship, gender, sexuality, and class, as well as who had the right to use the Guadalupe image, rose quickly to the surface. Even the Archbishop of Santa Fe voiced his opinion in the press.

This paper will address many issues of institutional representation multiple communities, and identity politics with specific examples from the "Our Lady Controversy" as well as discuss what worked in the complex situation and what didn't.

Copyright © 2003 Smithsonian Institution