Smithsonian Center for Lation Initiatives
The Interpretation and Representation of Latino Cultures: Research and Museums Conference Documentation
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Latino Graduate Training Seminar In Qualitative Methodology

Introduction

Conference Overview

Seminar Report

Secretary Small's Welcome

Dr. Cardena's Welcome

Credits

“Interpreting Latino Cultures: Research and Museums”

A Seven-Year Report

The seminar is designed to bring Latina and Latino graduate students from across the country to work together with distinguished Latina and Latino faculty, Smithsonian professionals, and curators and archivists from other national collections.  The program intends to support the career development of Latina and Latino graduate students, and to expose students to research career opportunities in museums and other public-oriented humanities institutions.   The program aims, to increase the number of Latinas and Latinos in institutions of higher education and museums.

Fifteen students enrolled in a graduate program in a U.S. university are selected every year on a competitive basis. An advisory board made up of scholars and Smithsonian staff does selection.

The seminar is sponsored by the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives and The Inter-University Program for Latino Research

PARTICIPANTS' FIELD OF STUDY:  1994 - 2001

  • Visual Arts Art History
  • Latin American Art History
  • Mid Nineteenth Century Borderlands History  
  • Mexican& Chicano Literary Art 
  • Mexican & Mexican Americans in El Paso (20th Century)
  • Outreach Education
  • Inter-Cultural Communication
  • Chicano Art/ Art History
  • Religious Studies/ Chicano/Mexican
  • Representations of Latino Identity/ Ethnic Studies
  • Post-Colonial Studies 
  • Chicano Cultural Production: Art, Literature, and Drama 
  • Immigration, Race and Ethnic Relations
  • Pictorial Arts, Painting, Murals and Public Administration
  • Folklore-History, Music and Identity
  • Education, Educational Policies  
  • Cultural Anthropology

PARTICIPANTS' DISCIPLINES:  (1994 - 2001)

History

21  

PARTICIPANTS' DISCIPLINES:  (1994 - 2001)

Art History

15

Cultural Studies 

12  

Social Studies

10  

English 

7   

Ethnic Studies 

6  

Folklore

4      

Anthropology

2

Archaeology

1

Interdisciplinary

1   

Museum Studies

Latin American Studies  

1

PARTICIPANTS BY UNIVERSITY AFFILIATION

Arizona State University

4

Brandies University  

1

Brown University

1

California State University, Los Angeles

2

California State University, Northrich

1

Claremont Graduate University

1

City University of New York

2

Columbia University

2

Cornell University  

4

Florida State University  

1

Golden Gate University

1

Harvard University

3

Indiana University

2

John Hopkins University

1

Michigan State University

1

Northeastern University

1

Purdue University

1

Pennsylvania State University

Stanford University

Tufts University

University of Arizona

2

University of California, Berkeley

University of California, San Jose

1

University of California, Santa Barbara

3

University of California, Santa Cruz     

4

University of California, Los Angeles    

3

University of Chicago

4

University of Connecticut

University of Denver

University of Florida

University of Illinois

6  

University of Manchester, England

1

University of Massachusetts

8     

University of Michigan

15  

University of Minnesota

1

University of Nebraska

1

University of New Mexico   

9  

University of Puerto Rico

2

University of Rochester

1

University of Texas, Austin

4

University of Texas, El Paso

Washington State University

1

Western Kentucky University

Yale University

1  

Click here for PARTICIPANTS ETHNIC PROFILE

 

GEOGRAPHIC SUMMARY BY REGION

Southwest

44 

* Arizona, California, Denver, New Mexico, and Washington State

East Coast

31 

* Florida, Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania and Washington, DC  

Midwest

39

*Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska and Texas 

PARTICIPANTS’ GENDER PROFILE

SMITHSONIAN FACULTY PRESENTERS

Dr. Refugio Rochin, Center for Latino Initiatives *

Dr. Miguel Bretos, National Portrait Gallery

Dr. Olivia Cadaval, Center for Folklife & Cultural Studies

Magdalena Mieri, Center for Latino Initiatives 

Dr. Spencer Crew, National Museum of American History *

Hector Corporan, Anacostia Museum *

Dr. Rex Ellis, Center for Museum Studies *

Dr. Alicia Gonzales, National Museum of the American Indian

Claudia Kidwell, National Museum of American History

Liza Kirwin, Archives of American Art

Pat Lynagh, National Museum of American Art Library

Seteven Newsome, Anacostia Museum

Hamlet Paoletti, Office of Public Affairs *

Marvette Perez, National Museum of American History

Fath Ruffins, Archives Center, National Museum of American History

Lonn Taylor, National Museum of American History

Maggie Bertin, National Museum of the American Indian

Andrew Connors, National Museum of American Art  *

Manuel Melendez, Office of Government Relations

James Early, Center for Folklife and Cultural Studies

Roberta Rubinoff, Office of Fellowships and Grants *

(* No longer a member of Smithsonian staff) 

GUEST FACULTY PRESENTERS

Bill Creech, National Archives I

Jane Christine O’Brian, National Research Council

Karen Mary Davalos, Loyola Marymount University

Ana Maria Escallón, Museum of Modern Art of Latin America 

Amparo Torres, Library of Congress

Frances Aparicio, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Antonia Castañeda, St. Mary’s University, San Antonio, TX 

Rosalinda Fregoso, University of California, Davis

Hank Grasso, Exhibits Consultant

Juan Gonzales, California State University, Hayward

Ramona Hernandez, University of Massachusetts

 Gilbert Cardenas, University of Notre Dame, Executive Director, IUPLR

Amelia Messa Bains, California State University, Monterey

Lucy M. Cohen, Catholic University

Ramón Favela, University of California, Santa Barbara

Juan Flores, Hunter College, NY 

Miguel Gandert, University of New Mexico

Alicia Gaspar de Alba, University of California, LA

Felix Padilla, Northeastern University

Tomás Ybarra-Frausto, The Rockefeller Foundation

Rick Blondo, National Archives II 

Cynthia Fox, National Archives I

Lois Fusek, National Endowment for the Humanities

Milton Gustafson, National Archives II

Maria Leyba, Museum of Modern Art of Latin America

Teresa Morales, Programa de Museos Comunitarios y Ecomuseos, Oaxaca, Mexico

Anya Nykyforiak, National Endowment for the Arts

SEMINAR EVALUATIONS

Participants evaluated the seminar every year.  The purpose of the evaluation was to determine whether the seminar accomplished the goals provided at the beginning of the seminar. Most felt that the seminar had been successful. The following is a compilation of the evaluations from 1994 ­2001.

  SUCCESSFUL  GOOD
1994   80%  20%
1995    100%     00%
1996  80%       20%
1997    90%   10%
1998  90% 10% 
1999 80%   20% 
2000   90%     10%  
2001      100%       0%  
                                    

In the summer of 2001 the Smithsonian Center for Latino Initiatives asked the Office of Policy and Analysis to conduct an evaluation of the training seminar. The purpose of the evaluation was to have an outside assessment of the program experience and to evaluate the impact the seminar has had in participant’s career choices.

Here is a summary of the evaluation findings:

The training seminar meets students’ expectations. The students consider the program to be excellent or outstanding.

Seminar participants are actively engaged in researching Latino issues in museum related fields or university teaching.

Seminar students would like to work at the Smithsonian, but the Smithsonian has employed only a few.

The creation of networks and fellowships is the program’s most significant contribution.

The seminar plays a role in the development of Latino/a scholars who have an interest in and a relationship with museums.

Copyright © 2003 Smithsonian Institution