Alfred Rascon
Public servant
Born: Chihuahua, Mexico

As a soldier and public servant, Alfred Rascon has served the United States with distinction for nearly four decades. In 2000, Rascon was belatedly awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his valorous service in Vietnam as an Army combat medic.

“We do not choose our fate or our family circumstances. Those who have little in life to begin with can find success if they have survival instincts and are highly motivated to succeed in life.”

Raised in the barrios of southern California, Rascon always dreamed of joining the military. In 1966, as a medic with the 173rd Airborne Brigade, Rascon repeatedly risked his life in the face of deadly enemy fire, saving two men despite his own injuries. Although he was nominated for the Congressional Medal of Honor days afterwards, the paperwork was lost in Pentagon red tape for more than three decades. In 2000, Rascon received the medal from President William Jefferson Clinton at a White House ceremony.

“I'm not a role model by choice, but by circumstances, like a lot of us are. We have a tendency to not understand what a hero is nowadays. A hero is somebody who gives him- or herself for others—that's what a hero is.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

Alfred Rascon, public servant. Photograph by Héctor Méndez-Caratini, taken at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington , D.C.

Alfred Rascon, public servant. Photograph by Héctor Méndez-Caratini, taken at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, Washington, D.C.

 

After retiring from a career of public service with the federal government, Rascon returned to military active duty in 2003. Today he is a role model for students and works with soldiers, veterans, and their families, offering support, assistance, and recognition for their contributions to the country.

“I'm Mexican by birth, American by choice.”

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

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